FAQs

Q?

Do you offer special diets for my pets?

A.

Yes! We carry Hills Science Diet products for cats and dogs, which range in variety to address health issues of pets. Diets are prescribed based on your pet’s health problem for maintenance.
We can also special order prescription diets from Royal Canin and Purina. Please call us if you need a special order for your pet.

Q?

Can I get a city license from your clinic?

A.

No. Our clinic does not issue city tags for either Rio Rancho or Albuquerque. We do, however, issue a Rabies tag and certificate for pets vaccinated at our clinic along with the information of where to send it in order to receive a city license.

Q?

What vaccinations and other treatments do I need for my new kitten?

A.

Kittens need a series of boosters to get their immune system strong enough to prevent a variety of common feline diseases. The FVRCP vaccine is a 4-in-1 booster that immunizes against Panleukopenia, Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, and Chlamydia Psittaci. No disease is good for any cat, and some may be fatal to kittens.

The first booster is due at 8 weeks of age. Most breeders and shelters will have already given the first booster to kittens before adoption. It is important to obtain vaccination records for your kitten from either the breeder or shelter. Along with the first booster, your kitten should receive a dewormer to rid any internal parasites it may have. If the kitten has already had its first booster, the breeder/shelter may request you take the kitten to a clinic shortly after for a wellness exam. Your veterinarian will thoroughly check over your pet and weigh it. If necessary, a fecal test may be given to determine if the kitten has any parasites, some of which may be transmittable to humans.

The second booster is usually given at 12 weeks of age. In this appointment, your kitten will be examined again by the veterinarian, re-weighed, and dewormed a second time. At 12 weeks old, your kitten may now receive a 1 year Rabies vaccination. If requested, your kitten is also old enough to receive a Feline Leukemia test. Dependent upon a negative result, the first Feline Leukemia Vaccination may be given. If you let your cat outdoors, it is strongly recommended that you give the Leukemia Vaccine.

With your kitten’s initial wellness care done, you can begin discussing spaying and neutering with your veterinarian. Our office will provide a printed estimate at your request for spaying or neutering. Many clients opt to microchip their kitten at the time of surgery, which is another procedure that can be discussed at this time with your veterinarian.

Q?

What vaccinations and other treatments do I need for my new puppy?

A.

Puppies need a series of boosters to get their immune system strong enough to prevent a variety of common canine diseases. The DA2PP-CV vaccine is a 5-in-1 booster that immunizes against Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 2, Parainfluenza, Parvovirus, and Coronavirus. No disease is good for any dog, and some may be fatal to puppies.

The first booster is due at 7-8 weeks of age. Most breeders and shelters will have already given the first booster to puppies before adoption. It is important to obtain vaccination records for your puppy from either the breeder or shelter. Along with the first booster, your puppy should receive a dewormer to rid any internal parasites it may have. If the puppy has already had its first booster, the breeder/shelter may request you take the puppy to a exam shortly after for a wellness exam. Your veterinarian will thoroughly check over your pet and weigh it. If necessary, a fecal test may be given to determine if the puppy has any parasites, some of which may be transmittable to humans.

The second booster is usually given at 9-10 weeks of age. In this appointment, your puppy will be examined again by the veterinarian, re-weighed, and dewormed a second time.

The third booster is then given at 12 weeks of age, and is the final booster for the year. Your puppy will again be examined and re-weighed by the veterinarian, and, at this age, a 1 year Rabies may be given. Another vaccination strongly recommended by our clinic is the Bordetella, or Kennel Cough, Vaccination. This vaccination, good for 6 months, helps prevent infectious respiratory diseases that are very easily transmitted between dogs. Many kennel and grooming facilities require this vaccination.

Also in the final vaccination appointment, our clinic strongly recommends you heartworm test your puppy, a test that takes only 5 minutes. If left untreated, heartworms can be fatal to dogs. At 12 weeks old, your puppy’s is old enough to begin using monthly heartworm preventative medication, a prescription maintained by a annual negative heartworm test.

With your puppy’s initial wellness care done, you can begin discussing spaying and neutering with your veterinarian. Our office will provide a printed estimate at your request for spaying or neutering your dog. Many clients opt to microchip their puppy at the time of surgery, which is another procedure that can be discussed at this time with your veterinarian.

Q?

Do I have to worry about heartworms in our area?

A.

Yes! Despite the fact that we do not live in a particularly humid climate, the threat of heartworms is still very real. Heartworms are transmitted by mosquitos, and one mosquito can travel a 5 mile radius. Coyotes and foxes can also be heartworm carriers, thus putting any dogs nearby at risk. The more infected mammals in the area, the more mosquitos carrying the parasite. There are more and more heartworm positive dog cases annually in New Mexico. The only way to ensure your pet’s safety from these nasty parasites is to test your dog and make sure they are on a monthly heartworm preventative medication. For more information on heartworms, click here.

Q?

How often to I need to heartworm test my dog?

A.

In order to ensure your pet’s saftey, our clinic requires annual heartworm testing in order to continue refilling your preventative medication. By complying to annual testing, and administering the preventative medication as directed, Merial, the company that produces Heartgard, will stand behind their 100% guarantee and fund the treatment for heartworms in your dog. For more information on Merial’s Heartgard guarantee, call 1-888-Merial-1.

Q?

When should I spay/neuter my dog or cat?

A.

Generally speaking, we recommend spaying or neutering your dog at 4-6 months of age, however, this time frame may vary on a case by case basis. It is important to spay your dog before she enters her first heat cycle, as this greatly decreases her chances of mammary tumors. It is also more expensive to spay a dog in heat, as there is a greater risk involved. Likewise, it is important to neuter your dog in the first year, usually at 4-6 months to prevent risk of cancer and other health and behavioral problems.

Q?

Why is it important to spay/neuter my dog or cat?

A.

It is very important to spay or neuter your dog or cat for multiple reasons. There are health, behavioral, and population control benefits to proceeding with spaying/neutering.

Health Benefits:

For female cats and dogs, spaying before the first heat cycle nearly eliminates the risk of mammary tumors. After the first heat cycle, the risk increases by 10%, and the risk continues to increase after each heat cycle. The older the female gets, the risk of having pyometra, an infection of the uterus, is substantially high in unspayed female dogs.

In male cats and dogs, neutering nearly eliminates the risk of prostate issues, like prostate cancer. Other abnormalities are more likely in un-neutered males like peri-anal masses, and other cancerous masses.

Behavioral Benefits:

Both male dogs and cats who are un-neutered will urinate to “mark” or, in the case of cats, “spray” urine to mark areas. This territorial behavior, as well as others, can be eliminated or significantly decreased with neutering. Neutering also makes for a calmer, happier dog, thus training is less stressful.

Population Control:

According to the Humane Society, there is roughly 6-8 million homeless dogs put into shelters every year. Approximately half of this number are euthanized. Spaying prevents accidental pregnancies and thus, more puppies at risk to becoming homeless in the U.S.

Q?

Do you offer cremation services?

A.

Yes! We know how difficult it can be when your pet reaches the end of life. We offer both private and communal cremation options for your pet. Private cremation is where you would receive the ashes back in an urn, and communal cremation would be cremation with no ashes returned. Prices vary, please call ahead for rates.

Click here to view cremation website